Although researchers found less component overhang in patients who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty with a gender specific component, they discovered no significant differences in Knee Society Scores or range of motion compared to patients who had the procedure before this design was available. “ There is no objective benefit to less radiographic overhang.” Alexander P. Sah, M.D. said at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual meeting. “There is no difference in range of motion or knee scores, but also no failure using the prosthesis. The availability of a more narrow component generally allows the use of a larger femoral component size.  A lower manipulation rate and higher stair scores may suggest a patellofemoral benefit when using the gender component. Lastly, the addition of a gender option does not show clinical improvements, but provides increased operative flexibility without s clinical downside.”
Orthopedicstoday June 2013

As health costs in the United States continue to increase, a recently presented study indicates that orthopaedics may be doing its part to contain costs in the face of challenging demographic trends.  “ Looking back over the past decade, growth in the Medicare spending on orthopaedic procedures was remarkably modest,” study author Daniel Bellatii, BS, said during his presentation at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting.  Belatti and colleague Phinit Phisitkul, M.D., analyzed the Medicare Part B claims databases for 2000-2010 for current procedural terminology (CPT) codes assigned to musculoskeletal treatment. They excluded any codes not associated with orthopaedics and categorized the procedures into 12 anatomical or functional groups for analysis.  They compared the trends in each group to national inflation and expenditure data during the same period.  The researchers found that overall Medicare payments for orthopaedic procedures rose by 63.7% during the decade, from 1.6 billion in 2000 to 2.6 billion in 2010 – an annualized growth rate of 4.8%.  However Belatti insists that is not the whole story. “ Adjusting for an 18% growth in the Medicare population over this period, along with changes in the value of the dollar, reduces the real growth in orthopaedic paymrnt to just ).65% annually.” The Global figure for Medicare spending once those corrections are made is 4.7% for the period, he noted.
Orthopedictoday June 2013

There is limited science behind the treatment of OS using PRP and HA. There are both differences and similarities though. HA has been used for a long time, especially in veterinary medicine often with good clinical success. Around 15-20 years ago its use in humans with OA increased markedly. One of the reasons is because it is a normal lubricant of the body itself, and therefore, never harmful. Several randomized controlled studies compared HA and saline have been carried out with varying success.  Taken together, some of these studies showed good, sometimes lasting, pain relief. However, most of the studies did not show any major differences. No major adverse events were evident on the other hand.  However, due to treatment failure and its high cost, HA treatment disappeared and is used less today. PRP is more recent and quickly gained popularity in a short time.  The hypothesis is that the concentrated growth factors will enhance healing is several parts of the body and PRP might be useful in the treatment of several different diseases.  It has been used mostly in patients with tendinopathies, such as Achilles tendinopathy, and less in patients with OA.
Orthopedictoday June 2013

Although researchers found less component overhang in patients who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty with a gender specific component, they discovered no significant differences in Knee Society Scores or range of motion compared to patients who had the procedure before this design was available. “ There is no objective benefit to less radiographic overhang.” Alexander P. Sah, M.D. said at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual meeting. “There is no difference in range of motion or knee scores, but also no failure using the prosthesis. The availability of a more narrow component generally allows the use of a larger femoral component size.  A lower manipulation rate and higher stair scores may suggest a patellofemoral benefit when using the gender component. Lastly, the addition of a gender option does not show clinical improvements, but provides increased operative flexibility without s clinical downside.”
Orthopedicstoday June 2013

As health costs in the United States continue to increase, a recently presented study indicates that orthopaedics may be doing its part to contain costs in the face of challenging demographic trends.  “ Looking back over the past decade, growth in the Medicare spending on orthopaedic procedures was remarkably modest,” study author Daniel Bellatii, BS, said during his presentation at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting.  Belatti and colleague Phinit Phisitkul, M.D., analyzed the Medicare Part B claims databases for 2000-2010 for current procedural terminology (CPT) codes assigned to musculoskeletal treatment. They excluded any codes not associated with orthopaedics and categorized the procedures into 12 anatomical or functional groups for analysis.  They compared the trends in each group to national inflation and expenditure data during the same period.  The researchers found that overall Medicare payments for orthopaedic procedures rose by 63.7% during the decade, from 1.6 billion in 2000 to 2.6 billion in 2010 – an annualized growth rate of 4.8%.  However Belatti insists that is not the whole story. “ Adjusting for an 18% growth in the Medicare population over this period, along with changes in the value of the dollar, reduces the real growth in orthopaedic paymrnt to just ).65% annually.” The Global figure for Medicare spending once those corrections are made is 4.7% for the period, he noted.
Orthopedictoday June 2013

There is limited science behind the treatment of OS using PRP and HA. There are both differences and similarities though. HA has been used for a long time, especially in veterinary medicine often with good clinical success. Around 15-20 years ago its use in humans with OA increased markedly. One of the reasons is because it is a normal lubricant of the body itself, and therefore, never harmful. Several randomized controlled studies compared HA and saline have been carried out with varying success.  Taken together, some of these studies showed good, sometimes lasting, pain relief. However, most of the studies did not show any major differences. No major adverse events were evident on the other hand.  However, due to treatment failure and its high cost, HA treatment disappeared and is used less today. PRP is more recent and quickly gained popularity in a short time.  The hypothesis is that the concentrated growth factors will enhance healing is several parts of the body and PRP might be useful in the treatment of several different diseases.  It has been used mostly in patients with tendinopathies, such as Achilles tendinopathy, and less in patients with OA.
Orthopedictoday June 2013

Although researchers found less component overhang in patients who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty with a gender specific component, they discovered no significant differences in Knee Society Scores or range of motion compared to patients who had the procedure before this design was available. “ There is no objective benefit to less radiographic overhang.” Alexander P. Sah, M.D. said at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual meeting. “There is no difference in range of motion or knee scores, but also no failure using the prosthesis. The availability of a more narrow component generally allows the use of a larger femoral component size.  A lower manipulation rate and higher stair scores may suggest a patellofemoral benefit when using the gender component. Lastly, the addition of a gender option does not show clinical improvements, but provides increased operative flexibility without s clinical downside.”
Orthopedicstoday June 2013

As health costs in the United States continue to increase, a recently presented study indicates that orthopaedics may be doing its part to contain costs in the face of challenging demographic trends.  “ Looking back over the past decade, growth in the Medicare spending on orthopaedic procedures was remarkably modest,” study author Daniel Bellatii, BS, said during his presentation at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting.  Belatti and colleague Phinit Phisitkul, M.D., analyzed the Medicare Part B claims databases for 2000-2010 for current procedural terminology (CPT) codes assigned to musculoskeletal treatment. They excluded any codes not associated with orthopaedics and categorized the procedures into 12 anatomical or functional groups for analysis.  They compared the trends in each group to national inflation and expenditure data during the same period.  The researchers found that overall Medicare payments for orthopaedic procedures rose by 63.7% during the decade, from 1.6 billion in 2000 to 2.6 billion in 2010 – an annualized growth rate of 4.8%.  However Belatti insists that is not the whole story. “ Adjusting for an 18% growth in the Medicare population over this period, along with changes in the value of the dollar, reduces the real growth in orthopaedic paymrnt to just ).65% annually.” The Global figure for Medicare spending once those corrections are made is 4.7% for the period, he noted.
Orthopedictoday June 2013

There is limited science behind the treatment of OS using PRP and HA. There are both differences and similarities though. HA has been used for a long time, especially in veterinary medicine often with good clinical success. Around 15-20 years ago its use in humans with OA increased markedly. One of the reasons is because it is a normal lubricant of the body itself, and therefore, never harmful. Several randomized controlled studies compared HA and saline have been carried out with varying success.  Taken together, some of these studies showed good, sometimes lasting, pain relief. However, most of the studies did not show any major differences. No major adverse events were evident on the other hand.  However, due to treatment failure and its high cost, HA treatment disappeared and is used less today. PRP is more recent and quickly gained popularity in a short time.  The hypothesis is that the concentrated growth factors will enhance healing is several parts of the body and PRP might be useful in the treatment of several different diseases.  It has been used mostly in patients with tendinopathies, such as Achilles tendinopathy, and less in patients with OA.
Orthopedictoday June 2013